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Add colorful foods to your diet



Many people don’t realize it, but the color of the food you eat can make a difference in your weight and overall health. If you look at your plate and don't see enough colorful foods, this probably indicates you are not eating as well as you should be. The key to designing a colorful, well balanced meal is to load up on a varied selection of fruits and vegetables.

Incorporating fruits and vegetables into meals gives your body a variety of vitamins and minerals, says Sherry Golightly, registered dietitian at Baptist Health Paducah. In addition, it also boosts one’s immune system, protects the body from viruses, and can even help in the fight against the mutation of cells in cancer. Fruits and vegetables are also lower in calories and fat, when cooked properly.

It is recommended to consume five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables a day. “This may seem overwhelming, but if you plan ahead, it isn’t too difficult,” said Golightly.

Simple ways to add healthy color to your diet are:

• Drink juices, such as V8, for one or two of your daily servings.

• Add vegetables to pizza and/or add a side salad.

• Add lettuce, tomatoes and pickles to sandwiches and burgers.

• Add fruit as a part of your meal, like adding raisins to a steamy bowl of oatmeal.

• Incorporate vegetables in unexpected foods like zucchini bread and squash pie.


When creating a meal, it is always important to have variety; the more color the better. By planning ahead and making simple, wise adjustments to your diet, your body will be getting the nutrients it needs, leading to a healthier, better functioning body.